ISSN: 2455-1414
Journal of Clinical Research and Ophthalmology
Short Communication       Open Access      Peer-Reviewed

Penetrating keratoplasty for the management of a severe idiopathic lipid keratopathy

Eirini Kaisari1, Emmanouil Blavakis1 and Georgios Kymionis1,2*

1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lausanne, Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital, Fondation Asile des aveugles, Lausanne, Switzerland
2Department of Ophthalmology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General Hospital “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
*Corresponding author: Georgios Kymionis, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lausanne, Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital, Fondation Asile des aveugles 15 Avenue de France, 1002, Lausanne, Switzerland, Tel: +41 79 333 22 59; E-mail: irenekaisari@gmail.com, gkymionis@gmail.com
Received: 18 August, 2021 | Accepted: 06 September, 2021 | Published: 07 September, 2021

Cite this as

: Kaisari E, Blavakis E, Kymionis G (2021) Penetrating keratoplasty for the management of a severe idiopathic lipid keratopathy. J Clin Res Ophthalmol 8(2): 043-043. DOI: 10.17352/2455-1414.000092

An 83-year-old female presented with progressive bilateral lipid keratopathy (LK) during the last 12 years. There was no history of previous ocular disease or trauma. Slit lamp examination of the left eye revealed a diffuse LK obscuring the visual axis and a temporal epithelial papillomatous lesion with superficial neovascularization (Figure A), while Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was 20/200 with eccentric fixation. An uneventful Penetrating Keratoplasty (PKP) combined with excision of the temporal lesion was performed. Pathologic examination was indicative of LK, revealing chronic stromal inflammation including lymphocytes and histiocytes, partially xanthomized and the presence of cholesterol crystals. Two years post-operatively, the corneal graft was clear and BCVA was 20/20 following cataract surgery (Figure B). LK is either idiopathic, typically bilateral, or unilateral secondary to corneal neovascularization due to ocular disease or trauma [1]. Our case illustrates a severe form of idiopathic LK, treated successfully with PKP.

  1. Hall MN, Moshirfar M, Amin-Javaheri A, Ouano DP, Ronquillo Y, et al. (2020) Lipid Keratopathy: A Review of Pathophysiology, Differential Diagnosis, and Management. Ophthalmol Ther 9: 833–852. Link: https://bit.ly/3tk9d9D
© 2021 Kaisari E, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
 

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