Abstract

    Open Access Review Article Article ID: GJCT-8-144

    Clinical trials cannot provide sufficient accuracy for studying weak factors necessary for curing chronic diseases

    Jianqing Wu* and Ping Zha

    Chronic diseases are still known as incurable diseases, and we suspect that the medical research model is unfit for characterizing chronic diseases. In this study, we examined accuracy and reliability required for characterizing chronic diseases, reviewed implied presumptions in clinical trials and assumptions used in statistical analysis, examined sources of variances normally encountered in clinical trials, and conducted numeric simulations by using hypothetical data for several theoretical and hypothetical models. We found that the sources of variances attributable to personal differences in clinical trials can distort hypothesis test outcomes, that clinical trials introduce too many errors and too many inaccuracies that tend to hide weak and slow-delivering effects of treatments, and that the means of treatments used in statistical analysis have little or no relevance to specific patients. We further found that a large number of uncontrolled co-causal or interfering factors normally seen in human beings can greatly enlarge the means and the variances or experimental errors, and the use of high rejection criteria (e.g., small p values) further raises the chances of failing to find treatment effects. As a whole, we concluded that the research model using clinical trials is wrong on multiple grounds under any of our realistic theoretical and hypothetical models, and that misuse of statistical analysis is most probably responsible for failure to identify treatment effects for chronic diseases and failure to detect harmful effects of toxic substances in the environment. We proposed alternative experimental models involving the use of single-person or mini optimization trials for studying low-risk weak treatments.

    Keywords:

    Published on: Mar 23, 2022 Pages: 21-33

    Full Text PDF Full Text HTML DOI: 10.17352/2581-5407.000044
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