Abstract

    Open Access Research Article Article ID: ACMPH-7-256

    Studies on prevalence of malaria and its adverse fetal outcomes in Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Owerri, IMO State, Nigeria

    Iwuchukwu IC* and Vincent CN

    Despite a massive increase in private and public efforts over the last years, malaria remains one of the most salient global health concerns. The study adopted cross sectional and descriptive survey design to assess the prevalence of maternal malaria and its adverse fetal outcomes in Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria from September, 2020 to March, 2021. The study population were 814 consented pregnant women in their reproductive ages (16 - 55years) who attended ante natal clinic or delivered of their babies at FMCO during the time of study. Data collection involved administration of closed ended questionnaire to illicit information on biographic data. Clinical assessments/examinations (laboratory investigations) of maternal peripheral blood, and fetal birth weight were utilized. Shortly before child birth maternal peripheral blood was obtained from each participant into sterile container for laboratory analysis. Statistical analysis of generated data was carried out using descriptive analysis and of percentages and presented using tables. Statistical comparisons and test of significance between positive and negative groups were calculated using the non-parametric Chi-square test. Differences were considered significant at P< 0.05. The study revealed that 65.6% had malaria during pregnancy. Malaria prevalence is significantly associated with maternal age bracket ( x2= 16.27; P < 0.05), gravidity (x2 = 14.9; P < 0.05) and level of education (x2= 24.69; P < 0.05). There is significant relationship between maternal malaria and perinatal mortality (x2 = 23.14; P < 0.05). There is significant effect of maternal malaria on perinatal mortality based on maternal age (x2= 40.11; P < 0.05) and gravidity (x2= 48.67; P < 0.05). An overall prevalence of preterm deliveries were 19.7%. There is significant relationship between maternal malaria and preterm delivery (x2 = 27.58; P < 0.05). There is significant effect of maternal malaria on preterm delivery based on maternal age (x2 = 49.2; P < 0.05) and gravidity (x2= 56.94; P < 0.05). An overall prevalence of low birth weight were 23.6%. There is significant relationship between maternal malaria and fetal birth weight (x2 = 34.06; P < 0.05). There is significant effect of maternal malaria on fetal birth weight based on maternal age (x2 = 53.82; P < 0.05) and gravidity (x2= 65.94; P < 0.05). The study suggests effective therapy since perinatal mortality due to maternal malaria was recorded in this study. Preterm deliveries and low fetal birth weight based on gravidity and maternal age groups associated with maternal malaria as identified is a call for program managers to make haste and implement new strategies for malaria control.

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    Published on: Aug 9, 2021 Pages: 151-163

    Full Text PDF Full Text HTML DOI: 10.17352/2455-5479.000156
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